Category Archives: Uncategorized

Blackmagic Design Wins 8 Good Design Awards, Including Coveted Design Team Award

Fremont, CA – July 7, 2017 – Blackmagic Design today announced that Good Design Australia has awarded them 8 “2017 Good Design® Awards,” including 7 product awards and the coveted “Design Institute of Australia Award/ Design Team Award.”

The annual Good Design Awards is Australia’s most prestigious awards for design and innovation, with a proud history dating back to 1958. The Awards celebrate the best new products and services on the Australian market, excellence in architectural design, digital and communication design and rewards emerging areas of design including business model innovation, social innovation and design entrepreneurship.

At this year’s Good Design Awards Ceremony in Sydney, Blackmagic Design’s entire design team was awarded the “Design Institute of Australia Award – Design Team Award.” This award is given to an Australian design team who have made a significant impact on Australian design over the year.

Also, after an extensive evaluation process involving more than 35 Australian and international design experts investigating hundreds of entries, eight Blackmagic Design products were recognised with Good Design Awards. This included two Best in Category Awards, one for the DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel in the Consumer Electronics Category and one for the URSA Mini Pro UI in the Interface Design Category. Good Design Awards were also awarded to the DaVinci Mini Panel, URSA Mini Pro, Video Assist 4K, Studio Viewfinder and the Blackmagic Broadcast Suite, which includes the ATEM Television Studio HD and HyperDeck Studio Mini, within the Product Design Category.
“It is an incredible honor to receive these Good Design Awards,” said Blackmagic Design CEO Grant Petty. “We see high quality design as being the ultimate expression of respect for our customers and it’s the role of design to make product easy and fast to use. We are thrilled to receive an Award for design as it’s a positive recognition by the design industry of all the hard work the design team at Blackmagic Design has put into the products.”

Blackmagic Design Announces Summer Special Price for Video Assist and Video Assist 4K

Fremont, California – June 27, 2017 – Blackmagic Design today announced a new summer special promotion for Blackmagic Video Assist and Blackmagic Video Assist 4K. During this promotion, customers can save AU$150 on the purchase of a Blackmagic Video Assist, and AU$414 on the purchase of a Blackmagic Video Assist 4K. That means Blackmagic Video Assist can now be purchased for only AU$615 and Blackmagic Video Assist 4K can be purchased for AU$935 from Blackmagic Design resellers worldwide while stocks last.

The Video Assist summer special makes it easier than ever for customers to add professional monitoring and broadcast quality recording to any SDI or HDMI camera. With the new summer special pricing for limited stock, customers will be able to buy a Video Assist for each of their cameras.

The Blackmagic Video Assist family of products gives customers better monitoring and higher quality recording than is available on many cameras. Older cameras often feature custom and hard to use file or tape formats, while lower cost consumer cameras often have poor quality file formats and small screens, limiting their professional use. Blackmagic Video Assist solves this problem because it works with every type of camera from DSLRs to older tape based camcorders, and even the latest digital film cameras. Customers get a large professional on set monitor, along with 10-bit broadcast quality ProRes and DNxHR recording.

In addition to professional monitoring and recording, the Blackmagic Video Assist 4K model will also support powerful built in scopes such as a waveform monitor, RGB parade, vectorscope and histogram in the upcoming Video Assist 2.5 Update, along with extremely high fidelity audio recording and microphone inputs.

“Video Assist is an incredibly versatile tool and has become an indispensable part of everyone’s production kit,” said Grant Petty, Blackmagic Design CEO. “It’s the perfect portable field monitor and recorder, and now customers can get them at an even lower price so they can add them to all of their cameras while stocks last!”

Blackmagic Video Assist 4K Key Features

  • 7 inch LCD touch screen with 1920 x 1200 high resolution monitor.
  • Professional 10-bit 4:2:2 ProRes or DNxHD recording up to Ultra HD 3840 x 2160p30
  • Dual high speed UHS-II SDHC card recorders use readily available, inexpensive SD card media.
  • Dual recorders allow non-stop recording and provide a backup if one fails.
  • 2 mini XLR connectors with 48V phantom power for connecting microphones.
  • -128dBV electrical noise floor for high quality audio recording.
  • LANC connection for remote control.
  • Auto start/stop recording using HDMI or SDI triggers.
  • Includes slots for 2 hot pluggable batteries as well as 12V DC power input.
  • Full compatibility with editing software such as DaVinci Resolve, Final Cut Pro X, Avid and Premier Pro.
  • All in one design, mount to cameras, hold in your hand or set up on a table with the included kickstand.
  • Includes 6G-SDI input allowing it to be used as an Ultra HD monitor.

 

Blackmagic Video Assist Key Features

  • 5 inch LCD touch screen with1080p high resolution monitor.
  • Professional 10-bit 4:2:2 ProRes and DNxHD recording in HD.
  • Includes slots for 2 hot pluggable batteries as well as 12V DC power input.
  • Full compatibility with editing software such as DaVinci Resolve, Final Cut Pro X, Avid and Premiere Pro.
  • All in one design, mount to cameras, hold in your hand or set up on a table with the included kickstand.
  • Includes 6G-SDI input with downconverter allowing it to be used as an Ultra HD monitor.

A More Civilized Age…

NoFilmSchool today put up an article featuring Alex Mallis and some of his tips on filming in 8mm.

If you’ve never had the opportunity to shoot on film I’d highly recommend it. The fact that you can feel the film rolling is magical, and having a really strict shooting ratio can do wonders for your work ethic.

(I’m looking into filming some 8mm this summer, if I can wire a replacement battery compartment for the old Minolta we had stored in the roof.)

As far as the article goes, there is some really good info here on the different issues and choices you’ll run into with such a legacy format. And thanks to the big-budget directors like J.J. Abrams and Christopher Nolan, film stock will hopefully still be produced for a log time to come.

Most of the links Mallis talks about are relevant to the US (for Australia Nanolab is a good place to start for 8mm).

Read the NoFilmSchool article here.

-K

minoltad6

Back in Blag

My apologies for the poor pun. But we are!

It’s been a while since the last post and quite a lot has happened in the world of film; another NAB has come and gone; Blackmagic have upped the anti for just about every other competitor, with a plethora of new cameras and modules; and DJI continues to innovate with cool new drone technology.

We’ll be keeping a weather eye on new developments so stay tuned! I’ll leave you with a video that could at the least be described as blasphemy. (Or maybe a DIY solution to a snorricam? Just make sure you have strong forearms.)

ARRI ALEXA Mini – The Selfie Stick from Anders Holck on Vimeo.

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Atomos Spyder

Another announcement to come out of this years’ IBC is the introduction of Atomos’s new video calibration tool the Atomos Spyder. Atomos say they have identified some common issues in current recording techniques and hope to solve these with their new releases. The first of which is the aforementioned Spyder intended to ensure greater colour accuracy while monitoring resulting in an outcome that is more consistent with what you were expecting.

 

Atomos Spyder

A statement from Atomos themselves:

“We have teamed up with Datacolor a leader in calibration equipment and produced a simple one touch calibration application that runs on Mac and PC and allows the user to instantly calibrate to SMPTE REC 709 with 6500K white balance. You connect the Spyder to the screen of the product and to the computer via USB, then connect a USB to serial cable to the LANC port of the Samurai Blade and press the one button to calibrate on the custom Atomos software. In a few minutes your screen is 100% calibrated and can be trusted for color! This is a major workflow and time saver because if you know your colors are accurate and you use the Waveform and monitoring tools provided in the Blade you will know 100% all scenes and shots are normalised and accurate in color. This will remove the need for heavy color grading in post and unlock the creative potential of video professionals by eliminating unnecessary time in color manipulation.”

To find out more: http://www.atomos.com/samurai-blade/

Secondly, Atomos have also released an update to the AtomosOS firmware for the Ninja 2, Samurai and Ronin models which introduces new and improved audio level monitoring capabilities with their application Audio Level Meters

 

audio meters



Atomos:
“We have created what we believe to be the most precise and smooth audio level meters in the industry, up their with the established high end audio players.
Samurai Blade AtomOS 5.03 receives 14 channels of precision audio level meter monitoring, you can adjust to see the 2 channels being monitored over headphones or all channels at once.
This was the final big feature requested form our customers and I am happy to say we have delivered some exception audio tools for our customers.”

To find out more or to download the updated firmware (and instructions for installation)

http://www.atomos.com/samurai-blade-firmware/

The Difference Between Raw Video and Uncompressed Video

If you follow Videomaker closely, you’ve likely seen us use the terms raw video and uncompressed video. We might say “Camera A captures uncompressed video” or “Camera B shoots raw.” Hopefully we’ve never said “Camera C shoots uncompressed raw video.” While they sound similar, they do mean different things and shouldn’t be used interchangeably. Continue reading